Yearbook and Blogging: Differences and Similarities: Part 2

To continue from last week’s previous blog post pertaining to the differences and similarities between being on a yearbook staff vs blogging.

Differences:

  • Hobby-what you do in your own free time. No deadlines, being your own boss and enjoying your work without it being criticized for not being perfect. 
  • Extracurricular Activity-working on everyone else’s time. You are under pressure by multitasking. For example, editing your assigned yearbook page for sports and still expected to go out and interview someone else who will be in a different section of the yearbook. You will have to redo your work until everyone revises and receives the “green light” from the yearbook adviser and editor-in-chief. 

Similarities:

  • Blogging can also be deadline driven if you work for a journalism company and use a blog to publish your work. 
  • These assigned posts/pages can or usually are planned out ahead of time but still not be published until after the deadline where you edit and hand in your work three to four times. 

Yearbook And Blogging:Differences and Similarities: Part 1

Yearbook and blogging might be two different projects you are doing as an extracurricular activity and hobby, but there are some similarities and differences between the two:

Differences:

  •  Deadlines: The adviser and editor-in-chief create deadlines for the staff because it takes one whole year to make a yearbook from front to back. As for blogging, you can choose when to publish your own work without being rushed by staff members and not follow through with a theme. In other words, you can post random ideas and subjects on your website without being hounded by your adviser and editor-in-chief unless you are working for a certain company that chooses different themes on a weekly basis. 
  • After you fill out a yearbook position application, you have to wait a little while before hearing back from the adviser. Unlike being on a yearbook staff, you can simply create your own website and create mini-projects, instantly. 

Neutral:

  • Deadlines: You create deadlines to post certain topics pertaining to real world experience. And you also have deadlines to meet your goal by getting the work done, edited and published for certain companies.

Similarities: 

  • Selecting Subjects to Discuss: Whether if you are interviewing students for a certain page in the yearbook or asking a relative about something from their past, you are publishing topics for the world to read and comment. In other words, your work can be influenced negatively nor positively, depending on what you published, how you interviewed someone and the words you have carefully selected. 
  • Creativity-You are free to be as creative as long as you know what to do and remembering your purpose of doing that certain project. For example, photojournalism: interviewing and photographing your subject for a specific blog post that you think is the most important for others to read for a certain reason. In other words, how does this subject affect my daily life? Or, how is this person a positive role model for everyone? Dig down to the creativity ditch and start on the most significant idea you have that relates to your theme. Visualize your plan and follow through.