“The Green Mile” Movie Review:

the green mile

“The Green Mile” is a film about Paul Edgecomb describing events to his friend, Elaine at the nursing home in regards to something that would unknowingly change his life forever. During the Great Depression era, he supervised E-Block at the Tennessee State Prison where the death penalty was held and soon met a kind inmate named John Coffey, a healer from God who can separate the good vs evil but died on death row due to being falsely accused of rape and murder, without hinting to the parents of the twin girls that the actual murderer was Wild Bill.

In general, this film was phenomenal. From acting to song choices and emotional dialogue, “The Green Mile” captivates the reality of life being intolerant to innocent individuals who died on death row. Not to mention but the speech from Mr. Edgecomb after Elaine’s funeral where he specifically states that we all owe a death one day.

While the film added raw emotion to it, there is one small criticism which can be bothersome to some southerners although it’s not a big issue. Despite the southern atmosphere, the country bumpkin accents were horrendous. It sounded as if the actors traveled down to Tennessee and North Carolina for the first time and never listened to how locals speak. Speaking to locals and living down in the southeastern United States for a while can help your accent improve tremendously along with a speech coach.

In conclusion, the younger generations to come should watch this film because it will show them how life does have its injustice but you can rise above those unfair situations and realize we all have our own green mile to walk until we depart from this world. As Sally Fields character said in Forrest Gump, “we must do the best with what God gave us.” In other words, no matter where our lives lead to, he will be right there with us while walking down our own green mile. The messages we learn from this film can be applied to in reality.

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Judd Travers: A Main Character from Saving Shiloh, 2006

Third Film:

  1. Begins to take responsibility for his own behavior and actions. (For example, when he apologized to Marty after yelling him due to a dog biting him on the leg).
  2. Was accused of murder by the entire town after a local citizen was killed. Turned out it was two different people who were running after David and Marty. No apologies from the community.
  3. Saved Shiloh and Marty’s lives after they nearly drowned in the river and eventually, earned respect from the entire community.
  4. Got a job with the Fire & Rescue Squad.
  5. Mentioned briefly that no matter what mood his father was in, he would beat him regardless.

*Side Note from all three of the films:*

  • You can’t change people overnight. Not only do you have to show kindness and work with  them patiently at a slow rate, they themselves have to catch on and eventually will learn how to control what they say, how to react and how both of these can reflect on their character. In other words, action speaks louder than words.
  • You must discover the truth as to why that person’s mean rather than gossip about them because you never know what they went through in their life.

Judd Travers: A Main Character From Shiloh Season, 1999

Second Film:

  1. As continued following the first movie, Judd clearly becomes depressed and a heavily drinker.
  2. Marty and Shiloh saved his life after getting into a truck accident from drinking and driving.
  3. In the middle of the movie, we find out that Judd was beaten as a child and stayed at his residence ever since while his older siblings ran off and his parents dying one after another.
  4. Becomes friendlier at the end of the film.

*Side Notes for the last two films:*

  • While Marty and Shiloh saved his life due a truck accident, in the third film he saved their lives from nearly drowning in a river.
  • Begins to receive trust from the Preston family at the very end when he allowed Ray, Marty & Shiloh into his trailer home for the first time, ever.
  • One question though: If Shiloh began accepting Judd at the end of the 2nd movie, how come he still didn’t cross the river to his house until the end of the 3rd film? (After all, it does take time to rebuild and regain one’s trust).

Judd Travers: A Main Character From Shiloh, 1996

In three different posts, I will compare and contrast the character Judd Travers from the three Shiloh films which were released within a 10 year time span (1996, 1999 & 2006). In the previous post from early this morning, it was mainly about life lessons that we can learn, receive and give to others (ex: Kindness). But anyway, here is how Judd was from the first film.

First Film:

  1. Judd drinks everyday, but not as heavy.
  2.  Not a committed person and tends to not follow thru with his promises to Marty until the very end of the film.
  3. His reaction at the end of the film when he lets Shiloh out of the truck, speaks volumes (preparation of what was to come in the second film).

*Side Notes for the first two films:*

  • Judd doesn’t own up to his own responsibilities as a dog owner nor as a human being
  • Stays home on a daily basis; doesn’t seem to have a job. Wonder why?
  • Drives to the store to purchase alcohol. How does he earn money, though?
  • Hunts in the first two films: Raccoons and Squirrels
  • Mainly drank beer in the first two films