New Post of Not Showing Fear in Writing Skills:

Link to the older post: No Fear in Writing Skills

Here is how I would write this post today:

“From the beginning of my early school years through the end of my college career, my writing styles were horrendous. Meaning, my sentences were run-on, incomplete with a lack of clarity and knowledge.

After creating a blog, I realize that my writing style will change as time marches forward. Five years later, it did. Blogging has given me confidence but it also helped me recognize the flaws which can be corrected by patiently rearranging my sentence structures and use a set of terms to make my posts flow smoothly.

Remember, we shall not fear our writing styles but take the time to critique it and combine your stories in a unique manner. Secondly, ask relatives and peers to evaluate your work. The final step is to receive constructive criticism, learn from your mistakes and grow as a blogger.”

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New Post of Blogging & Journals: Similar or Different?

Here is a link to the old post: Journals and Blogs Similar?

Here is how I would write that post today:

“What’s your purpose for creating a blog? Did you create one to expand upon your writing skills? Perhaps sign up and use it as an online journal to vent out your frustrations?

It depends on the necessary tools to which you can utilize your blog and discover what captures a reader’s attention. For some individuals, they blog to write stories while others use to find a voice in a cause for two different intentions: 1) they are passionate about their dreams for advocacy or 2) they have a voice crying out for help.

Everyone has their own definition of blogging and what their intentions are to create one. Journals are hand-written, containing personal information to vent out anger while bloggers create a website to gain experience in the media industry as a hobby.  In ways, journals and blogs can be the same while they can also be different. “

Editing Blog Posts from 5 Years Previously:

When I review my blog posts to which I have written five years previously, I am shocked to see how many errors I should have corrected at that time. From the beginning, I was terrified that my writing style would be criticized because I used many run-on sentences along with the lack of using logical thinking to ensure that my headlines and stories would collaborate together. To any avail, they did not flow well at all.

My plan for now is to go back, re-write my blog post and post a link to my old post on there in order to help beginning bloggers that your writing style can change within the first five years or more. Errors are mistakes to which we make but it’s up to us to learn from them even if someone did not critique us for it. As bloggers, it’s our job to create headlines, write the story, edit and press the “publish” button. Not only those tasks but to understand that constructive criticism will help us along the way.

Seasonal Kickers to Match Your Captions:

Here are some seasonal kickers to create and match your captions if you are writing stories about the four seasons all year-long:

Winter:

  1. Heat Up The Stat:
  2. Light Up A Match & Cuddle Up:

Summer:

  1. Down the Temp to which Has Risen:
  2. Humidity Rise as Storms Bruise through Town:

Spring:

  1. A Time to Bloom and Zoom Through:
  2. Time Zones from Dusk to Dawn:

Fall:

  1. Red Formation Falling Over:
  2. Orange is the Signature Color:

One More Kicker & Caption Example to Provide:

geese with family

Follow The Green Rocky Road: A flock of ducks were seeking for food with their parents on a giant green road filled with flowers and rocks. To their avail, they found their source of comfort to keep them flocking around the park. 

Headlines Pertaining to A Story on Blood Donations:

Headline topics should be short, to the point and flow with the story. If you are assigned to pitch a story to your editor about a blood donation for two days on your school campus, it’s important to label the story headlines as:

  1. “Donate Blood To Save Lives? We Are Here For Those in Need Now!”
  2. “Are You Here To Save Lives? Donate Your Blood For (insert company)!”
  3. “Need to donate blood? They Are Here For Your Support!”
  4. “Do You Help Those in Need? If So, Please Donate Your Blood Here!”

As repetitive as these headlines are, it’s crucial for them to be parallel with each other based upon the interviewees and their reasons to donate blood in order to save someone’s life.

#blood-drive, #correspondence, #donation, #headline-topics, #indicate, #parallel

Spring Approaching Slowly On The Rise:

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As early as February, the temperatures moved into the high 70’s while the weather dips back into winter one week before Spring arrives. Here is an image taken in March on a cold day with the chance of grass gradually growing on the ground slowly as the wind blows against the tree branches with no pedals on the sticks yet.